Teenage Drinking – How Many Teenagers Die From Alcohol Abuse Each Year?

Teenage drinking becomes the youth’s means of leisure’s, especially those who are studying. Even high school students are already used to drinking, during break time, week ends or the so called “Saturday night fever”. This usually happens when peer groups join together, go bar hopping or simply in small bars just to while away the time.

What causes teenage drinking?

The life of a teenager is a period of mixed emotions, thoughts, and adjustment. This is the period where they starts to join groups and pressured by their peers.

And this is the period which is considered difficult to handle by their parents. A rebellious stage for teenagers that makes it hard to understand what they want from their lives.

Sometimes, teenager drinks because they always see their parents drinks. Over a period of time, parents drinking have a great effect on the teenage mind, resulting to drinking as a way to escape reality.

Other cause of teenage drinking is due to love problem. Often times when they faced a relationship problem, they resort to drinking to forget the temporary break up or worries that their relationship would end.

With the increase in teenage drinking, every day there are almost death due to vehicular accidents and this will continue if left unchecked by parents.

Study shows that drinking related death toll each year rose to 5000 and about one fourth of these accidents are due to drunkenness. In 2005 alone, 12 teens ages 16 – 19 died every day from motor vehicle injuries and more than 1,700 college students, between the ages of 18 – 24, get injured due to direct result of alcohol abuse.

According the NHTSA report, 31 percent of teen drivers killed in 2006 had been caused by drinking alcohol and 25 percent had a blood alcohol concentration of.08 or higher.

Additionally, every two hours a teenager dies from an alcohol related accident – an alarming situation.

There should be something that needs to be done by the government, the school, parents and the community as a whole to curve this teenage drinking habit.

Suggested measures to control teenage drinking habit

Education. It’s the duty of all involves especially parents and the school to teach the kids at an early age. One-on-one counseling by parents to the kids are critical to the well-being of their future. They should be given the right advice not to deal a single shot with alcohol because it’s dangerous to get used to it.

Teens should be given more attention in their early stage and parents are the main actors for their safety and security. They should coordinate with school authorities, communities and other core groups responsible for teens welfare.

A well coordinated efforts by these group of authorities focusing towards the teenagers future could form a solid plan that would be used as a guide to make the future of these teenagers more productive and useful to the society.

Alcohol Abuse – Chemical Imbalance Or Demonic Curse?

There is ample evidence to support the idea that alcohol abuse correlates to a chemical imbalance in the brain, or that alcoholics have a DNA strand that is peculiar to them alone. That being the case, what are the spiritual implications for alcoholics and can a cure be found through faith?

There is much work being done unravelling DNA codes and increasingly scientists are finding that particular personality types have their own gene base that predisposes them to this or that behaviour pattern. Perhaps in time we will have mapped the gene pattern for murderers, rapists, artists and politicians. But gene patterns are one thing and the right to choose the way we live is another. Being born with a particular trait does not mean we must spend our lives tied to destructive and self-harming habits.

In Psalm 139 we are told that God knew us even before we were born, that he knit us in our mother’s womb. That particular word “knit” is an important one since it describes precisely the nature of the DNA strand. The author of that psalm would not have known much about genetics yet the verse he wrote is biologically accurate. That means if there are genes that predispose us to bad behaviour, God put them there. Why? That is a question we will never be able to answer fully or with any certainty, but we can use our knowledge of scripture to form a reliable guess.

We do know that the New Testament encourages us to become born again. Being born again washes us in the clear waters of Christ’s teachings. We are all given the choice between life and death, and choosing Jesus means choosing life. Are we then, by being reborn in Christ, overcoming the defect of our genetic makeup which otherwise becomes a playground for satan?

It is a tantalising thought. By choosing to follow the dictates of the flesh we charge headlong into the abyss; while the spiritual cleansing brought about by sincere remorse and repentance makes us ready for eternity.

The alcoholic suffers much in the course of his or her habit, and the devil can have a field day knowing he has a captive. The only way to break free from the chains of the demonic curse is to look to Jesus for salvation. As in all things, His is the only way to freedom.

Protecting Kids From Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Children are often exposed to the temptation to try drugs and alcohol long before parents suspect. Sometimes at the age of 10 or 11, or even younger, kids are experimenting with drinking. The fact of the matter is that parents often have their “heads in the sand” when it comes to their precious children using drugs and alcohol. By the time we find out, it can be too late.

Some possible clues early on:

Lower than normal grades
Rebellious behavior
A new friend or friends (especially when their time is being totally monopolized)
Depression or other behavior problems

Steps to take before children get to the age of temptation:

Develop good self esteem in your child (building self confidence)
Get involved in your kids’ lives
Establish basic rules early
Develop a stable home life as much as possible and teach good coping skills which helps to prevent stress and anxiety
Give them a good focus for their life, such as the church or sports, or career goals
Develop an interest or passion for something healthy, such as music or collecting, or animals
Set good examples when they are little, such as “no drugs or alcohol in the home”
Make a “no drugs policy” perfectly clear to them as soon as it’s appropriate

If you suspect your children are experimenting:

Set up deterrents for breaking the family rules, such as drug testing, drug screening or a breathalyzer test (alcohol test) after going out with their friends or when they particularly want to be trusted
Impose punishments which fit the “crime”
Try some volunteer work at a homeless shelter or drug rehabilitation center to give them a different perspective on life
Visit someone in prison
Try diverting their attention to a new interest or passion (away from the problem)
Reward good behavior

If you know they are doing drugs or abusing alcohol:

Counseling with a mental health professional may help
Take them to AA meetings or similar (go with them)
Drug rehabilitation if the problem is further along
Make a regular date (suggest weekly or more often) with them for a “one on one” meeting to talk about what’s going on in their life (a dinner out works well, but you can do this at home also)
If possible, sometimes changing schools or moving to another address can be helpful

From my life:

I know these things from experience, as I was one of those parents with “my head in the sand”. I had no idea what was happening to my daughter at school everyday. I really thought she was still a “little girl”. It started in middle school when she was about 12. She was 14 when she overdosed on alcohol at a party. This was a party where parents were present and in the next room! Her friends brought her home and deposited her on the front doorstep. She was limp. I was shocked. We called an ambulance and she went to emergency. There she tested positive for marijuana, meth, barbiturates and heroin! We were fortunate, she eventually recovered. After that we tried a lot of different things including extensive drug counseling, therapy, threats, meetings, punishment. I set up a regular weekly dinner out for just the two of us. At first she fought me about going. For weeks she sat there and said nothing. Slowly she began to open up about things in her life a little at a time and eventually she told me she looked forward to our dinners out. What worked better than anything as a deterrent, was buying a breathalyzer. If I had known this would work so well, I would have bought it first thing. We also tried some drug tests, but getting the results in a week or even a few days is too long. Now the drug tests work faster and don’t usually have to be sent into a lab. The breathalyzer results were immediate and she knew it was there waiting for her to try when she came home! It’s also affordable and easy to use. I would recommend it to any parent of a teenager who suspects alcohol abuse.

Just as a followup, my daughter is 20 now. She’s fully recovered. It wasn’t easy. I was very persistent and I prayed a lot. She has her own successful business now and is doing well.